26 Feb 2019 | Tracey M Benson || Bytetime

Words 4 Water @MITWater Night

Tonight some of my video works will be presented at part of the annual MIT Water Night which brings together water scientists, artists, technologists and water lovers. Here is a couple of tweets about the show Super happy to see some of “Words for Water” being exhibited as part of MIT Water Night – wish […]

21 Feb 2019 | Reading and Walking

25. Tim Cresswell, Place: An Introduction

  It took me a long time to finish reading Tim Cresswell’s little introduction to the concept of place. It wasn’t because it’s a difficult book—it isn’t—but because it’s the middle of the semester and I’m tired and distracted. I have to start studying for my Cree midterm today, so I won’t get back to […]

18 Feb 2019 | Tracey M Benson || Bytetime

When the Rivers Run Dry

This year I have started a new series of works exploring the inland lakes and rivers of the Murray Darling Basin (MDB), building on the Words for Water project. As an ACF River Fellow and River Ambassador, I have learnt a lot from other Fellows from around the MBD about the many challenges the rivers […]

14 Dec 2018 | writethemap

Austerlitz & Beyond

  John Payne in W.G Sebald’s Footsteps…. There is no doubt in my mind that Austerlitz Station in Paris is the key to this rather enigmatic novel which draws a personal and emotional and rather misleading map of Europe, said John, misleading in that the novel appears to be meandering nowhere and the story and […]

21 Oct 2018 | writethemap

The Trouble with Maps…

‘A map can tell me how to find a place I have not seen, but have often imagined. When I get there, following the map faithfully, the place is not the place of my imagination. Maps, growing ever more real, are much less true.’ Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry A map constitutes relationships and connections, […]

26 Sep 2018 | LucyFurLeaps

The Moon Over Tolworth

In the mundane modern semi-detached suburbs slippers, gravel, teatime tables GCSE revision the Moon guides me home welcomes me to this season with its golden corona moonflower harvest sky   The Moon ~O~   I speed down the A3 toward Tolworth Tower follow the curve of the road there it is again on the right … Continue reading The Moon Over Tolworth →

16 Sep 2018 | LucyFurLeaps

Ancient Droves and the Tolworth Area Plan

“The poetry of earth is never dead: When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge, about the new-mown mead; That is the Grasshopper’s.” On the Grasshopper and Cricket, John Keats In the midst of the summer heatwave and haze, we … Continue reading Ancient Droves and the Tolworth Area Plan →

09 Aug 2018 | LucyFurLeaps

Walk the Ancient Droves of Tolworth Court Farm, Sunday 12th August

The latest in our series of Tolworth Treasure and the Hogsmill Hum walks is a walk across Tolworth Court Farm Fields, our local nature reserve. We will meet at the white bridge over the Hogsmill / Bonesgate Stream at 11am and take you on a journey through the ancient fields of Tolworth Court Farm, which … Continue reading Walk the Ancient Droves of Tolworth Court Farm, Sunday 12th August →

15 May 2018 | LucyFurLeaps

Walking in Richard Jefferies’ Footsteps, Monday May 7th 2018

  Outside Richard Jefferies’ House, Ewell Road “Jefferies left school at fifteen and at first continued his habits of solitary wanderings about the local countryside. He dressed carelessly and allowed his hair to grow down to his collar. This, with his “bent form and long, rapid stride made him an object of wonder in the … Continue reading Walking in Richard Jefferies’ Footsteps, Monday May 7th 2018 →

29 Mar 2018 | LucyFurLeaps

In the footsteps of Richard Jefferies – Part One

Did you know that one of our most cherished and important nature writers lived in Tolworth? Richard Jefferies (1848-1887) was born in Coate in Wiltshire, but moved to live in Tolworth, at 296 Ewell Road, from 1877 – 1882. During this time he wrote what is acknowledged to be his finest writing, some of which … Continue reading In the footsteps of Richard Jefferies – Part One →